Case Study: Part of Appendix Left Behind After Surgery Leads to Further Appendicitis

Compensation: £6,750

Simon, 37

This case study outlines how we helped a man to claim £6,750 compensation after part of his appendix was left behind after surgery resulting in appendicitis.

If you are looking for information on how JMW can help you to make a claim yourself you can go directly to our surgery error claims page here, and if you are looking for information on appendicitis please visit the NHS website here.

Simon suffered an agonising second bout of appendicitis and further surgery after doctors failed to remove the whole of his appendix when he developed the condition the first time round. Simon’s case was taken on by Steven Brown, one of the specialist solicitors at JMW, and he was awarded £6,750 in compensation.

Appendix removed 

Simon’s ordeal began when he developed severe abdominal pain one day. After the pain had continued for 12 hours Simon could bear it no longer and attended A&E to get checked out. 
Various tests were performed which revealed nothing of note so a diagnosis of a grumbling appendix or severe constipation was made. Simon was sent home with paracetamol and laxatives and told to return if the pain increased.  

The next day Simon returned to A&E; the pain was persisting, his abdomen was swollen and he had not opened his bowels. Treatment was given to open his bowels however it did not relieve the pain. Simon was admitted and kept in hospital overnight. 

The next day further tests were carried out and it was suspected that Simon was suffering from appendicitis. That day he underwent the removal of his appendix and spent two weeks recovering from the operation. 

Further appendicitis

Fourteen months later Simon awoke in the night with severe abdominal pain. He was doubled up in pain and nauseous so went to his GP, who found his abdomen to be tender. As Simon had supposedly had his appendix removed the GP ruled out appendicitis and believed Simon to be suffering from gastritis and pancreatitis, possibly related to alcohol consumption 36 hours previously. The GP prescribed some medication and advised Simon to return in five hours for a review when he would be sent to hospital if he was no better.

At his review with the GP Simon was found to be slightly worse and his abdomen was very tender. The GP again ruled out appendicitis as Simon’s notes stated that he had had his appendix removed. Nevertheless the GP referred Simon to hospital for a surgical opinion due to the degree of tenderness and uncertainty about what was wrong. 

At hospital the registrar who examined Simon suspected he was suffering from stump appendicitis, which is a rare condition that can occur if doctors fail to remove the whole of the appendix first time round.

A CT scan was arranged which revealed that part of Simon’s appendix had indeed been left behind in the previous operation and this was now inflamed and problematic. A second operation to remove the remaining part of the appendix was carried out.

Consequences

Due to the failure of doctors to remove the whole of Simon’s appendix first time round he had developed a second bout of painful appendicitis. He also had to undergo a second operation, suffered further scarring and have more time off work than was necessary.

Settlement

After contacting the specialist solicitors at JMW for advice Simon’s case was taken on by Steven Brown who was successful in securing Simon £6,750 in compensation for the suffering he endured. 

Have you also suffered negligent appendix surgery?

If you believe you or someone you know has suffered in a similar way, give us a call to discuss the situation and to see whether you could be entitled to compensation. Ring us today on 0800 054 6512, or complete our online enquiry form and a member of our friendly team will get in touch with you. 

< Back to main surgical negligence claims page



Endorsed By



Accreditations

Read more
Call us now on 0800 054 6512 for advice on Clinical Negligence


Spotlight on Cauda Equina Syndrome
Wildcard SSL Certificates