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Cervical Cancer Prevention Week

This week (Monday 21 January – Sunday 27 January 2019) marks cervical cancer prevention week, a topic held close to our hearts in the clinical negligence department at JMW.

Many have been taking part in the 10 year challenge on social media to show how much their physical appearance has changed in the last 10 years. Others have chosen to highlight that this year also marks 10 years since Jade Goody sadly passed away from cervical cancer at the age of 27.

Cervical cancer screening such as a smear test is a quick 5 minute test that saves lives. A smear test is free and can detect any cell changes or abnormalities on the cervix caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). It is important to remember that the HPV vaccine does not prevent cervical cancer and with the number of women attending their cervical smears at a record low, it is vital that this trend is reversed, especially as in the event that abnormalities are detected, they can be treated in a timely manner.

My colleagues Naomi O’Rourke and Rebecca Schofield have recently highlighted the importance of increasing the number of women attending their cervical smear test which, although may be uncomfortable, is not painful and could save a woman’s life. A number of celebrities including Michelle Keegan and Rebekah Vardy have also taken to social media to help raise awareness and emphasise the importance of cervical cancer screening.

The clinical negligence department at JMW know far too well the heart breaking effects a delayed diagnosis of cervical cancer and any other form of cancer can have.

Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust is the only UK charity dedicated to women, their families and friends affected by cervical cancer and cervical abnormalities. They offer information on symptoms, treatment and support. Every year in the UK, around 3,000 women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer. Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women aged 35 and under.

The #SmearForSmear campaign has also been launched to raise awareness and create a talking point to eradicate any stigma that may be associated with cervical cancer. Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust have also published that two women lose their lives to cervical cancer every day and nine women are diagnosed with cervical cancer on a daily basis. A smear test can help to prevent cervical cancer.

For more information about Cervical Cancer Prevention Week and Cervical Cancer Awareness, please visit the Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust website:

Ladies, if you do one thing this week, please book in for your cervical smear test.
It could save your life.

 

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