Court Issues Timetable

Both sides are obliged to submit a suggested timetable (known as “directions”) to the court about how a case will progress, with a view to proceeding to a final hearing.  These directions should ideally be agreed upon between both sides prior to their submission to the court, however, this is not always possible and conflicting directions are sometimes submitted. If there is a disagreement between the parties about what directions are likely to be needed, the court may require a brief hearing which your lawyer will attend.

Regardless of whether or not both sides agree upon the directions prior to their submission to court, it will be up to the judge appointed to your case to determine what directions will apply.  The judge may even choose to issue a set of directions that combines proposals from both sides.

Directions will include provisions for both sides to disclose relevant documentation to each other, exchange witness statements and medical reports, pre-trial check lists and dates for a final hearing. Your lawyer will advise you on the directions given on your case, how these will be followed, and what you need to do.  It is vital that you follow any directions given on your case, as if you don’t, it can significantly impact your case.

Life Cycle of a Claim

There are two types of Personal Injury cases, as follows:

Portal Cases

Generally these are cases where your compensation award is likely to be less than £25,000 and the injury has occurred in England and Wales.

Non-Portal Cases

Generally, these are cases that either; i. have occurred abroad. ii. Are likely to provide you with compensation in excess of £25,000 or iii. Have left you with life-changing injuries.

Learn about the types of cases we deal with

Case taken on

After getting in touch with us, your case will be passed to a lawyer, who will discuss with you your injuries and how they have affected you and about your claim generally.

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Contact made with other party or their insurers

Your lawyer will make contact with the defendant, generally via their insurer. This is either done via an online portal or a formal letter.

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Liability accepted

If the defendant accepts liability for your accident, it means that they accept legal responsibility and accept that they need to pay you compensation, subject to your lawyer proving the extent of the injuries and financial loss your accident has caused you.

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Liability denied

The defendant does not accept that they were responsible for your injuries. We will take steps on your behalf to obtain evidence to support you and encourage them to change their position.

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Seek evidence

A range of evidence will help us build a full picture of how much compensation you should receive. We will then work hard to secure it on your behalf.

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Negotiation

Negotiations to settle your claim can take place at any time. However, we would usually recommend only trying to negotiate a settlement once the full extent of your injuries and financial losses are known.

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Case settled

Settlement negotiations can take place at any time during the course of your claim. Your lawyer and most likely a barrister will represent you.

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Issue court
proceedings

We may need to issue court proceedings in order to progress your case

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Case settled

Settlement negotiations can take place at any time during the course of your claim. Your lawyer and most likely a barrister will represent you.

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Court issues
timetable

After court proceedings have been issued, the court will put a timetable in place, with input from both your lawyers and the defendant, with a view to proceeding to a final hearing.*

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Case settled

Settlement negotiations can take place at any time during the course of your claim. Your lawyer and most likely a barrister will represent you.

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Complying with
timetable

Once a timetable has been agreed, your lawyers and the defendant will have to comply with it. This involves exchanging relevant documents that will be relied upon to support or oppose your case.

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Court hearing

Your case will be listed for a final hearing, often months in advance, and you should make sure that you are free to attend this in order to give evidence to support your case. The judge will decide whether or not the defendant is at fault and what compensation you are entitled to.

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Case concluded

Your case will be concluded at the final hearing. We will work hard to ensure your compensation award is the best possible amount to enable you to get on with your life!

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